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Mole Calculator

Mole Calculator

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Mass

 

Molecular Weight (g/mol)

Moles

 

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An online mole calculator helps you to calculate the number of moles of a substance based on the molecular weight (also called molar mass) and the quantity of that material. This online calculator also enables you to do the following conversions:

  • Mass to Mole
  • Mass & Moles to Molecular Weight
  • Molecular Weight & Moles to Mass

A significant feature of this mole conversion calculator is that it also determines the number of particles (atoms, molecules etc.) of the substance along with handling a large number of measurement units for mass (i.e. g, lbs, stone, oz, ton etc.) as well as for mole (i.e. M, mM, nM, pM etc.).

What is a Mole?

The Mole is an amount unit similar to pair, dozen etc. and it contains \(6.02214076 x 10^23\) number of particles, whereas this number (\(6.02214076 x 10^23\)) is called the Avogadro’s Number or Avogadro’s Constant.Very large quantities of very small entities such as atoms, molecules or other specified particles are measured in Mole (also spelled as mol).

Mathematical Equation:

The mathematical expression used for calculating moles is as follows:

$$NS = /frac{mS}{MS}$$

Where,
NS = Number of Moles of the substance
mS = Mass of substance in grams
MS = Molar Mass of the substance

Our Mole Calculator solves this equation in a split second giving accurate results and saving your time and hassle.

How Much is a Mole?

One mole of different substances contains the same number of particles i.e. \(6.02214076 x 10^23\) but the weight of each sample would be different. As we know, the number of protons, neutrons and electrons in atoms of different elements differ, consequently making the masses of those atoms different from each other. On similar lines, one mole of different substances would weigh differently.

How Many Atoms in a Mole?

12 g of Carbon(C) = 1 Mole of Carbon (C) = (\(6.02214076 x 10^23\)) number of Atoms
63.5 g of Copper (Cu) = 1 Mole of Copper (Cu) = (\(6.02214076 x 10^23\)) number of Atoms

How Many Molecules in a Mole?

58.44 g of Sodium Chloride (NaCl) = 1 Mole of Sodium Chloride (NaCl) = (\(6.02214076 x 10^23\)) number of Formula Units
18 g of Water = 1 Mole of Water (H2O) = (\(6.02214076 x 10^23\)) number of Molecules

Avogadro’s Number:

The concept of Mole is based on a specific number i.e. \(6.02214076 x 10^23\). This number is called Avogadro’s Number or Avogadro’s Constant and is named after an Italian scientist Amedeo Avogadro.
The Avogadro number basically relates the number of constituents particles in a sample with the amount of substance in that sample proportionately.

This number may appear to be overwhelmingly large but you can easily determine the number of particles using this moles calculator.

Molecular Weight Or Molar Mass:

It is the intrinsic property of an element and is based on its Atomic Mass that is further based on the number of protons and neutrons in that element.

Molar Mass of a compound is simply a proportionate sum of the molecular weights of its constituent elements. Knowledge of molar mass is essential for mole conversions but calculating molar mass is a very detailed task and requires rigorous use of the periodic table. However, no need to worry because we have got your back with our Molar Mass Calculator that does particular conversions.

How to Find Moles of a Substance? (Step by Step)

Following is the basic mathematical formula which is being used in this online tool to calculate number of moles of a substance:

$$ Number of Moles = /frac {Mass of Substance}{Molar Mass} $$

It is evident from this mathematical expression that we need to know any of the 2 variables for computing the third value.

For Calculating Moles:

If we need to calculate the number of moles of a substance, simply divide the given Mass of the Substance by the given Molar Mass. This conversion can also be done using our grams to moles calculator.

For Calculating Mass:

If we need to determine the mass of a substance, simply divide the given number of Moles of the Substance by the given Molar Mass. Similar operation can be performed using our moles to grams calculator.

For Calculating Molar Mass:

If we need to determine the Molar Mass of a substance, simply divide the given Mass of the Substance by the given number of Moles.

Above-mentioned steps have been demonstrated in the following solved examples.

Solved Examples:

Following solved examples clearly illustrate the methods elaborated in the preceding section. Results of these problems can be verified using our mole calculator.

Example-1:

Calculate the number of moles of aluminum present in
(a) 108 g and
(b) 13.5 g of the element

Solution:

As per the periodic table, relative atomic mass of Aluminum (Al) = 27

a) $$ Number of Moles = /frac {Mass}{Molar Mass}$$
$$ = /frac {108}{27} = 4 Moles $$

b)$$ Number of Moles = /frac {Mass}{Molar Mass}$$
$$ = /frac {13.5}{27} = 0.5 Moles $$

Example-2:

Calculate the number of moles of magnesium oxide, MgO in
(a) 80 g and
(b) 10 g of the compound

Solution:

As per the periodic table, relative atomic mass of Oxygen (O) = 16 and Magnesium (Mg) = 24

Mass of 1 Mole of MgO:
$$ = (1 x 24) + (1 x 16) $$
$$ = 40 g $$

a) $$ Number of Moles = /frac {Mass}{Molar Mass}$$
$$ = /frac {80}{40} = 2 Moles $$

b)$$ Number of Moles = /frac {Mass}{Molar Mass}$$
$$ = /frac {10}{40} = 0.25 Moles $$

Example-3:

How many moles of Acetic Acid \( (HC_2H_3O_2) \) in a 5.0 g sample of pure Acetic Acid?

Solution:

As per the periodic table, relative atomic mass of Oxygen (O) = 16, Hydrogen (H) = 1 and Carbon (C) = 12
Mass of 1 Mole of \( HC_2H_3O_2 \):
$$ = (4 x 1) + (2 x 12) + (2 x 16) $$
$$ = 60 g $$

$$ Number of Moles = /frac {Mass}{Molar Mass}$$
$$ = /frac {5}{60} = 0.0833 Moles $$

These calculations can easily be replicated using our mass to moles calculator. Relatively complex problems involving large amounts of masses and molar masses can be solved instantly using this grams to moles calculator. It also has an added benefit of determining the number of constituent particles in each sample thus, it serves as a grams to molecules calculator as well.

Example-4:

Calculate the mass of
(a) 2 moles of Iron
(b) 0.25 moles of Iron

Solution:

As per the periodic table, relative atomic mass of Iron (Fe) = 56
a) mass of 2 moles of iron
$$ = number of moles × molar mass $$
$$ = 2 × 56 $$
$$ = 112 g $$

b) mass of 0.25 mole of iron
$$ = number of moles × molar mass $$
$$ = 0.25 × 56 $$
$$ = 14 g $$

Example-5:

Calculate the mass of
(a) 3 moles of carbon dioxide gas, \( CO_2 \)
(b) 0.2 moles of carbon dioxide gas, \( CO_2 \)

Solution:

As per the periodic table, relative atomic masses of Carbon (C) = 12 and Oxygen (O) = 16
Mass of 1 mole of CO2
$$ = (1 × 12) + (2 × 16) $$
$$ = 44 g $$

a) mass of 3 moles of CO2
$$ = 3 × 44 $$
$$ = 132g $$

b) mass of 0.2 mole of CO2
$$ = 0.2 × 44 $$
$$ = 8.8 g $$

Example-6:

If an experiment calls for 0.500 mol \( CaCO_3 \), how many grams of pure calcium carbonate do we need?

Solution:

As per the periodic table, relative atomic masses of Carbon (C) = 12, Oxygen (O) = 16 and Calcium (Ca) = 40.
Mass of 1 mole of \( CaCO_3 \)
$$ = (1 × 40) + (1 × 12) + (3 x 16) $$
$$ = 100 g $

Mass of 0.5 moles of \( CaCO_3 \):
$$ = 0.5 × 100 $$
$$ = 50g $$

This moles to grams calculator is able to solve these problems with greater accuracy and least effort on your part. Although its main feature is to convert moles to grams, it also has an added benefit of determining the number of constituent particles in each sample, thus, it has a functionality of a moles to molecules calculator as well.

Example-7:

If 5 moles of NaCl weigh 292.2 g, what is the molar mass of table salt?

Solution:

As per the periodic table, relative atomic mass of Sodium (Na) = 22.99 and Chlorine (Cl) = 35.45.

$$ Number of Moles = /frac {Mass}{Molar Mass}$$
$$ Molar Mass = /frac {Mass}{Number of Moles} $$
$$ Molar Mass = /frac {292.2}{5} $$
$$ Molar Mass = 58.44 g/mol $$

Example-8:

If 1 kg of pure copper contains 15.74 Moles, what is the molar mass of Copper?

Solution:

$$ Number of Moles = /frac {Mass}{Molar Mass}$$
$$ Molar Mass = /frac {Mass}{Number of Moles} $$
$$ Molar Mass = /frac {1000}{15.74} $$
$$ Molar Mass = 58.44 g/mol $$

This mole conversion calculator also helps you calculate molar mass of a substance using a similar mathematical approach but in less time. If the substance is an element then the output of this calculator will also contain the number of atoms of that element hence, it acts as a grams to atoms calculator as well.

How to Calculate Moles Using this Calculator?

This calculator works in three different modes and these can be accessed from the drop down menu titled “Calculate”.

In each mode, this mol calculator takes different inputs and produces a range of results as shown below:

To Calculate Moles:

Select “Moles” from the drop down menu titled “Calculate”.

Inputs:

  • Mass of the material
  • Molecular Weight of the material
  • Press the “Calculate” button.

Outputs:

  • Moles of the substance
  • Number of constituent particles of the substance i.e. atoms, molecules etc.

To Calculate Mass:

Select “Mass” from the drop down menu titled “Calculate”.

Inputs:

  • Molecular Weight of the material
  • Number of Moles of the material
  • Press the calculate button:

Outputs:

  • Mass of the substance
  • Number of constituent particles of the substance (i.e. atoms, molecules etc.) contained within that mass.

To Calculate Molar Mass:

Select “Molecular Weight” from the drop down menu titled “Calculate”.

Inputs:

  • Mass of the material
  • Number of Moles of the material
  • Press the calculate button:

Outputs:

  • Molecular Weight of the substance
  • Number of constituent particles of the substance (i.e. atoms, molecules etc.) contained within that mass.

Note: No matter what is your desired output within the domain of Mole, you can easily determine it using our Mole Calculator if you know at least two input values. Moreover, it also executes mole conversion by providing the number of constituent particles in the material.

FAQs:

When are we required to convert moles to grams?

While performing a chemical reaction in a lab, we can easily determine the number of moles of a substance required for that process through some analytical approach. However, we need to physically weigh the substance in order to add it to the reaction flask. That’s where this mol calculator comes in handy.

What is the minimum data required for a moles to grams conversion & vice versa?

We need to know the Molar Mass in order to calculate the number of grams either manually or by using this mole conversion calculator.

What is a Formula Unit?

Basic constituent particles of an element are called atoms whereas covalent compounds are composed of molecules. Similarly, a formula unit is the basic building block of ionic compounds. Our moles to molecules calculator also provides the number of formula units in case of ionic compounds.

How many Formula Units in a Mole?

The number of constituent particles (atoms, molecules or formula units) in a mole are fixed and are equal to \( 6.02214076 x 10^23 \).

Conclusion:

Use of this mole calculator comes in handy when you are solving some complex problem and don’t want to get involved in repetitive tasks. Due to their extremely small sizes, atoms, molecules and formula units are usually very difficult to work with. However, mole enables a chemist to work with large enough quantities which are handle able for practical uses.

References:

International Bureau of Weights and Measures, SI base unit: mole (mol)

Wikipedia the free Encyclopedia – Mole (Unit)

Mole | Definition, Number, & Facts. Encyclopedia Britannica.